Core Vaccines protect pets but non-core vaccines or over-vaccination can cause immune system and brain damage in humans and animals

 

RABIES VACCINE INFORMATION"The Jab" is high profit for the veterinarian because it often leads to serious immune system breakdown and/or neurologial damage

 

Despite the Veterinary Assoc. policy which this site backed, many vets still insist on "sticking it" to dogs and their owners. Learn about adverse reactions to RABIES shots, right here, right now.

 

 

Note: Scroll down for Vaccine Lawsuit Info

 

RABIES CHALLENGE FUND $20,000 MATCHING PLEDGE

 

May 2007 | Two anonymous donors have generously pledged to match all donations of $100 or more to The Rabies Challenge Fund up to $20,000 from May 1st through November 1st. The Fund is more than halfway towards reaching its immediate goal of $177,000 to cover the two concurrent challenge studies’ first year expenses so the research can begin.

 

The donors state that, “We are unabashed dog lovers and will do anything in our power to promote their health, longevity and overall well-being. That is the reason we have established a $20,000 matching gift program for the Rabies Challenge Fund. If you believe, as we do and as W. Jean Dodds, DVM, has stated, that “Rabies is the vaccine most associated with adverse reactions because it’s so potent”, then please support this initiative, particularly now so that your $100.00 or more donation will be doubled.”

 

The Rabies Challenge Fund Charitable Trust is a 501 (c) (3) tax-exemption organization founded by pet vaccine disclosure advocate Kris L. Christine of Maine in 2005 to finance 5 and 7 year long-term duration of immunity challenge studies on the canine rabies vaccine. Two world-renowned giants of veterinary vaccine research -- Dr. W. Jean Dodds of Hemopet and Co-Trustee of The Rabies Challenge Fund and Dr. Ronald Schultz of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine -- have volunteered their time to ensure this important research is conducted in the United States. The vaccine studies will be performed by Dr. Schultz at the University of Wisconsin according to USDA vaccine licensing requirements.

 

“This matching pledge offers a marvelous opportunity to reach our goal soon and begin the study!” Dr. Dodds stated.

 

The concurrent vaccine studies will determine the duration of immunity conveyed by the canine rabies vaccine, with the goal of extending the state-mandated interval for boosters to 5, and then to 7 years. Scientific data suggest that vaccinating dogs against rabies every three years, as most states require, is unnecessary. Studies have shown the duration of protective immunity as measured by serum antibody titers against rabies virus to persist up to seven years post-vaccination, and results of a 1992 French challenge study led by Michel Aubert demonstrated dogs were immune to rabies five years after vaccination.

 

Researchers believe the rabies vaccine can cause adverse reactions in animals and concur that it should not be given more often than is necessary to maintain immunity. Adverse reactions to rabies vaccination can include autoimmune diseases affecting the thyroid, joints, blood, eyes, skin, kidney, liver, bowel and central nervous system; anaphylactic shock; aggression; seizures; epilepsy; and fibrosarcomas at injection sites.

 

Fund founder and Co-Trustee, Kris Christine, noted that, "This generous $20,000 matching pledge presents pet owners with a wonderful opportunity to double their contributions of $100 or more to help get the studies underway as soon as possible. The USDA does not require manufacturers to conduct long-term duration of immunity studies on canine vaccines, so rabies immunization laws reflect the minimum, not the maximum time for which vaccination confers immunity. Vaccine manufacturers lack the financial incentives to conduct this research, thus it is up to concerned pet owners to fund these studies to determine whether state laws require their dogs to be over vaccinated against rabies as current scientific data indicates."

 

More information on The Rabies Challenge Fund and the concurrent 5 and 7 year challenge studies it will finance can be found at the fund’s website designed by volunteer Andrea Brin at: www.RabiesChallengeFund.org


November 2006

World-Famous Scientists Donate Services to

The Rabies Challenge Fund Charitable Trust

 

Big news for The Rabies Challenge Fund Charitable Trust:  thanks to graphic designer, Andrea Brin, it now has its own website.  You'll see the big news is that Dr. Ronald Schultz of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine has volunteered his time to conduct the 5 and 7 year canine rabies challenge studies.  If you recall, Dr. Schultz's research forms part of the scientific base for the American Animal Hospital Association's 2003 and 2006 Canine Vaccine Guidelines.  The December 2006/January 2007 (Vol. 8, Issue 6) Animal Wellness Magazine features an article by Ann Brightman on the RCF entitled, How Often Does He REALLY Need a Rabies Shot?

 

Since last year, W. Jean Dodds, of Hemopet and Co-Trustee of The Rabies Challenge Fund Charitable Trust, and her staff have donated their time to ensure these vital studies are conducted for the benefit of our canine companions.

 

We hope you'll join us in this effort, too!

Regards,  Kris L. Christine, Founder, Co-Trustee The Rabies Challenge Fund


PRESS RELEASE!

 

Two world-renowned giants of veterinary vaccine research -- Dr. W. Jean Dodds of Hemopet and Co-Trustee of The Rabies Challenge Fund and Dr. Ronald Schultz of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine -- have volunteered their time to ensure that critical 5 and 7 year rabies challenge studies are conducted in the United States.  The studies are to be financed by The Rabies Challenge Fund Charitable Trust, a tax-exemption organization founded by pet vaccine disclosure advocate Kris L. Christine of Maine in 2005, and will be performed by Dr. Schultz at the University of Wisconsin.  The University has waived its usual 48% overhead fee for these studies.

 

The concurrent challenge studies will determine the duration of immunity conveyed by the canine rabies vaccine, with the goal of extending the state-mandated interval for boosters to 5, and then to 7 years.  According to Dr. Dodds, This is one of the most important projects in veterinary medicine. It will benefit all dogs by providing evidence that protection from rabies vaccination lasts at least 5 years, thereby avoiding unnecessary revaccination with its attendant risk of debilitating adverse reactions. "

 

Scientific data indicate that vaccinating dogs against rabies every three years, as most states require, is unnecessary. Studies have shown the duration of protective immunity as measured by serum antibody titers against rabies virus to persist for seven years post-vaccination, and results of a 1992 French challenge study led by Michel Aubert demonstrated dogs were immune to rabies five years after vaccination.  Researchers believe the rabies vaccine causes the most and worst adverse reactions in animals and concur that it should not be given more often than is necessary to maintain immunity.  Adverse reactions to rabies vaccination can include autoimmune diseases affecting the thyroid, joints, blood, eyes, skin, kidney, liver, bowel and central nervous system; anaphylactic shock; aggression; seizures; epilepsy; and fibrosarcomas at injection sites.

 

Dr. Schultz states that “showing that a vaccine for rabies can provide 5 or preferably 7 years of immunity would have great significance not only in controlling rabies but more importantly in reducing the adverse vaccine reactions that can occur in dogs and cats after vaccination."

 

To date, the following breed clubs, along with many pet owners, trainers, breeders, and kennel owners have contributed to The Rabies Challenge Fund:

 

Akita Club of America
American Shih Tzu Club
Bernese Mountain Dog Club of NashobaValley
BerneseMountain Club of SE Wisconsin
CapitalCity Cocker Club
Chesapeake, Virginia Dog Fanciers Association
Collie Club of Georgia
Dog Agility Racing Team of Chino
Evergreen Empire Manchester Terrier Fanciers
GreatRiver Stockdog Club
Heart of Minnesota Great Dane Club
Kennel Club of Buffalo
Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation
Kishwaukee Kennel Club
Kuvasz Fanciers of America
LehighValley Kennel Club
Miniature Schnauzer Club of Southern California
Northern Illinois Schutzhund Club
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Club of Canada
Pacific NW Jack Russell Terrier Rescue Network
Soft-Coated Wheaton Terrier Club
Staffordshire Terrier Club of America
Standard Schnauzer Club of Southern California
Wachusett Kennel Club

 

GOOD NEWS ON RABIES AND ALL VACCINES

From The Editor: For all who ever doubted they could achieve or change anything, here’s the proof. People like Kris Christine and Jean Townsend “Always for George, Always for the Rimadyl dogs” prove that one person can move a mountain when they create a snowball. Our deepest gratitude to all who work so hard to protect our best friends! This is one of the most important advances in DogCare during the last two decades.  Chris can be contacted at LedgeSpring@lincoln.midcoast.com

 

The Rabies Challenge Fund

World-renowned vaccine research scientist and practicing veterinary clinician, Dr. W. Jean Dodds of California, and pet vaccine disclosure advocate, Kris L. Christine of Maine, have established The Rabies Challenge Fund to raise money to fund concurrent 5 and 7 year rabies vaccine challenge studies in the United States.

 

In addition to the challenge studies, the fund will finance a study of the adjuvants used in veterinary rabies vaccines and establish a rabies vaccine adverse reaction reporting system.

 

Rabies vaccination is the one immunization required by law across the country for domestic dogs and cats, and researchers believe this vaccine causes the most and worst adverse reactions in animals. According to the August 2003 Journal of Veterinary Medicine, a research study by M. Vascellari and colleagues documents cancerous tumors in dogs at the presumed injection sites of rabies vaccinations.

 

Although pets used to be vaccinated yearly for rabies, the majority of state protocols now require re-vaccination every three years. There are scientific data indicating that vaccinating dogs against rabies every three years is unnecessary. Results of Michel Aubert’s French challenge study published in 1992 demonstrated that dogs were immune to a rabies challenge 5 years after vaccination and the serological studies of Dr. Ronald Schultz (Professor and Chair of the Department of Patho-biological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine) have shown that dogs have antibody titer counts at levels known to confer immunity 7 years after vaccination for rabies. The Rabies Challenge Fund has been founded to improve the safety of rabies vaccines and to determine, by challenge, if they confer immunity for 5 or 7 years.

 

The Rabies Challenge Fund’s first official sponsors are Deb Odom (Florida) and Dawn Turner (Arizona), who have committed to donating a portion of the proceeds from the sale of their pet vaccine informed consent posters and informational flyers.

 

Donations can be sent to: THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND, c/o Hemopet, 11330 Markon Drive, Garden Grove, CA 92841

 

Rabies is among the antigenically strongest vaccines, containing potent adjuvants to bolster the immune response. Rabies vaccines are documented to elicit severe and even fatal adverse reactions. According to Dr. Dodds, “giving them more often than truly needed is unwise, unnecessary, and can be unsafe.” She further states, “To date, most states require rabies vaccination every three years, but some states still require annual rabies revaccination, even though the USDA licenses these vaccines for three years”.

 

Dr. Dodds received the D.V.M. degree with honors in 1964 from the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Toronto. In 1965 she joined the New York State Health Department in Albany and began comparative studies of animals with inherited and acquired bleeding diseases. Her position there began as a Research Scientist and culminated as the chief of Laboratory of Hematology at the Wadsworth Center. In 1980 she also became Executive Director of the New York State Council on Human Blood and Transfusion Services. This work continued full-time until 1986 when she moved to Southern California to establish Hemopet, the first non-profit national blood bank program for animals.

 

“Certainly, veterinarians are aware of the adverse reactions that can occur after rabies and other vaccinations in dogs and cats,” Dodds said. “The public is the body most motivated to address the issues here, because it is some of their beloved companions that have suffered by the existing regulations.”

 

Other beneficial research to be financed by The Rabies Challenge Fund will be a safety study of adjuvants used to enhance the immune response in veterinary rabies vaccines. Some pet owners, like Kris Christine, believe the adjuvants may cause more adverse reactions than the actual vaccine -- her own dog developed a malignant mast cell tumor at the site of a rabies shot. “Unlike human vaccines where all adjuvants are required to be the same, there is no such standardization in veterinary medicine,” Christine said. “Hopefully, this study can be completed before the five and seven years of the parallel challenge studies, to make vaccines safer for our precious canine companions.”


Kerry Blue Foundation Donates $5,000 to Rabies Challenge Fund

The Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation (http://www.kerryblues.info) has generously donated $5,000 to The Rabies Challenge Fund, which was established to raise money to finance concurrent 5 and 7 year rabies vaccine challenge studies in the United States. It is spearheaded by world-renowned vaccine research scientist and practicing veterinary clinician, Dr. W. Jean Dodds of California, and pet vaccine disclosure advocate, Kris L. Christine of Maine. The Kerry Blue donation was announced by the Foundation’s President, John Van den Bergh.

 

“As an educational organization, we are happy to be able to fund a study that will finally shed some light on vaccination research,” says Van den Bergh. He believes that by supporting The Rabies Challenge study, “We will have the ammunition to talk to legislators to bring the law in line with science.”

 

TheDogPlace.org has made a pledge for ongoing support and we hope you will too!


 

Pet Vaccine Lawsuit

It's official -- the law firm of the Chicago law firm of Childress Duffy Goldblatt, Ltd.

 

petvaccine@childresslaw.net 312-494-0200 -- attorneys Roy R. Brandys and John Sawin -- have posted an announcement on their website about the NATIONAL pet vaccine class action lawsuit that their firm is undertaking at: www.childresslaw.net/CM/Custom/Custom52.asp "arising from the misrepresentation of the need for vaccinations for your pets."

 

Anyone wishing to have a copy of either the 1992 French challenge study data from a research team led by Michel Aubert in which dogs were demonstrated to be immune to a rabies challenge 5 years after vaccination, or Vascellari's study which documented cancerous tumors in dogs at presumed injection sites of rabies vaccine, please e-mail me. Kris Christine LedgeSpring@lincoln.midcoast.com


Editor’s Note: Please, go to the Rabies Challenge Fund website and DONATE NOW!!! TheDogPlace.org has worked with Kris for many years as she single-handedly raised awareness, testified before state and local veterinary associations and lawmakers, and succeeded in getting some of the most highly respected vets and veterinary universities on board.

#1011124 http://www.thedogplace.org/VACCINES/Rabies-Update-Lawsuit-0705.asp

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PARASITES!

 

Unless protected, all Parasites such as fleas, ticks, mites and intestinal worms are all canine parasites and all parasites depress your dog's immune system.  Conversely, a weak immune system can't fight off the toxins and damage done by parasites, whether internal or external.dogs have fleas, ticks, and worms.

 

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